Great Bloody Scotland, It’s Alex Gray!

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‘Brings Glasgow to life in the same way Ian Rankin evokes Edinburgh’        Daily Mail

It figures that a fresh graduate of English and Philosophy, who is dauntless enough to do time as a visiting officer for the (now defunct) Department of Social Security, would have the savvy to transform her encounters into riveting crime fiction later in her life. She also taught English to high schoolers, a profession with no small requirement for grit and wiliness.

Crime may hide in the shadows, but author Alex Gray will no longer keep to them with her reputation bounding alongside other high-ranking crime fiction novelists. The Reading Room is excited to announce her appearance for our February 27 meeting.

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‘Few have matched the sustained high quality of [Alex Gray’s] output …What she delivers is sound characterisation, convincing Glaswegian atmosphere and superior writing.’     The Times

Alex Gray was born and educated in Glasgow. She was briefly a folk singer as a student in Glasgow. She taught for ten years until diagnosis of an illness forced her to quit, in 1993; thus commenced the fulfillment of a dream to write professionally. This led to immediate success with short stories, articles and commissions for BBC radio programmes. She has been awarded the Scottish Association of Writers’ Constable and Pitlochry trophies for her crime writing. 

A regular on the Scottish bestseller lists, her previous novels include Five Ways to Kill a ManGlasgow KissPitch BlackThe RivermanNever Somewhere ElseThe Swedish Girl and Keep the Midnight Out.

Alex Gray is the co-founder, along with Tartan Noir crime novelist Lin Anderson, of the international Scottish crime writing festival, Bloody Scotland, which had its inaugural year in 2012. These two writers, with Alanna Knight, are the Femmes Fatales crime writing trio–“intriguing, quirky and highly enjoyable”, according to Edinburgh Evening News.

 

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‘Wide-ranging and interwoven strands woven into an engrossing plot … she pulls them gleefully and artistically together . . . a writer ready to join the top rank of crime authors’            Daily Express

Gray’s forthcoming book, Only the Dead Can Tell,  will be published this March 22. It is the landmark 15th DSI William Lorimer novel.

We look forward to seeing all of you at Alex Gray’s reading on February 27, in Edinbane Community Hall. The programme begins at 7:30 p.m., with refreshments served at intermission. There will be plenty of time for Q & A, so along with a grand welcome for this acclaimed Scottish crime writer, bring your curiosity for how she done it.

Admission is £5 and free for members. Our reasonably priced memberships are always available at our meetings and online. Feel free to browse our Cheap-O Great Read selection or to add to the assortment. Also available are volumes of our anthology series, Words From An Island.

For information about our programmes, membership or for other questions, please contact us at  skyereadingroom@yahoo.co.uk or message us on Facebook at Reading Room – Skye.

More coming up…

March 16: Open Mic at An Crùbh, Duisdale, organised in conjunction with SEALL.

March 27: Ross Sayers, reading from his debut novel, Mary’s the Name, which takes place in Stirling and on Skye.

April 24: AGM, with guest speaker. Everyone welcome. This is your chance to bicker and spit and hopefully offer some constructive goals for the Reading Room – refreshments served to make it sweeter, along with a special speaker.

The Reading Room (Seòmar Leughaidh) receives support from the Live Literature Fund, Scottish Book Trust.SBT logo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Top 5 Lists of Josephine Tey Novels

We had a passionate Josephine Tey evening last Tuesday, October 25, with Tey biographer, Jennifer Morag Henderson (Josephine Tey: A Life, Sandstone Press, 2015) and an audience of new and already rabid Tey fans. Jennifer promised to send us her Top 5 Tey Lists, so here they are.

A couple of the books on the second list are rather difficult to get hold of. The library might be able to help with the Helen Grime book, which Jennifer thinks is only available in an academic library edition at a very high price, but since the Hugh McIntosh book of poetry she mentioned is virtually impossible to track down, she’s substituted one of the Dodie Smith autobiographies instead. The Tey book which features one of Hugh’s poems is To Love and Be Wise.

Top 5 Tey novels:

1. The Daughter of Time
2. The Singing Sands
3.  Brat Farrar
4. The Man in the Queue
5.  Richard of Bordeaux (penned as Gordon Daviot)

Top 5 Tey-related books from Jennifer’s research:

1. Dorothy L. Sayers, Gaudy Night
2. Mavis Doriel Hay, Death on the Cherwell (this was really to highlight the British Library Crime Classics series, which are widely available)
3. Dodie Smith, The Town in Bloom
4. Dodie Smith, Look Back With Mixed Feelings
5. Helen Grime, Gwen Ffrangcon-Davies: Twentieth-Century Actress

And here is the link to the UHI Josephine Tey conference, July 13 -16, 2017: https://josephinetey.wordpress.com/