Marcello Tully to Share Snapshot of His Life

The Reading Room is fortunate that the Scottish Book Trust helps us put on a good party once a year for Book Week Scotland. We could only wish that our special guest for our November celebration were providing the refreshments.

Brazilian-born Marcello Tully represents the literal interpretation of the 2017 Book Week Scotland theme, “Nourish”. It is what he does, it is what he loves.

He will be reading from the first book he has written, The Key Ingredient, which he says is more than just a collection of recipes, it’s about the making of Marcello. A reflective snapshot of the life experiences that have defined him.

His passion for food developed while in his teens, when he worked part-time in London as a commis-chef in a local French restaurant. While reflecting his cooking style, The Key Ingredient recipes also weave in Marcello’s Brazilian heritage, his classical Roux- brothers training and his passion for the Highlands of Scotland, with their great bounty of local produce.

After Marcello relocated his family to the north-western isles in 2007 to take his place as Chef Director of Skye’s Kinloch Lodge, he was awarded a Michelin star for seven consecutive years.

Marcello represents Kinloch and Scotland around the world, as an ambassador and spokesman for the industry, and he has appeared frequently on TV, radio and in the press. He provides food demonstrations throughout the year to hotel guests, across the Uk and beyond. He recently has launched a series of workshops and classes at Kinloch Lodge, where he teaches a range of chef skills; he also shows how a professional kitchen operates and inspires guests with new ideas for entertaining at home.

Also on the menu for the evening is a Cookbook Frenzy – swap, buy, auction and browse a range of cookbooks. Bring your own, bring your friends’, bring your grandmothers’ or any other cookbooks you would like to share or show and tell to others.

Please join us for Marcello Tully and Scottish Book Week on Tuesday, November 28, 7:30 p.m., at Edinbane Community Hall. Everyone is welcome and there is no admission fee. Parking at the hall is limited, but there is street parking.  Refreshments will be served.

For more information about this event or about the Reading Room, contact us at skyereadingroom@yahoo.co.uk or message us on Facebook at Reading Room – Skye.

~ Book Week Scotland is aBook Week Scotland week-long celebration of books and reading that takes place every November.

During Book Week, people of all ages and walks of life will come together in libraries, schools, community venues and workplaces to share and enjoy books and reading. They will be joined in this celebration by Scotland’s authors, poets, playwrights, storytellers and illustrators to bring a packed programme of events and projects to life.

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Open Mic at the Reading Room

How long have we been breathless for this?

The Reading Room has received input from local writers who ache for a platform from which to deliver their private (secretly longing for exposure) works of poetry and prose–and we’ve listened to you…

Ta Da! Show up at Edinbane Hall on Tuesday, June 27, for our Experimental Open Microphone event. It will be kicked off by Francis Mitchell, who is adept at the handling of the shy and the bold and all comers can be sure of an amenable reception. 

Cakes, tea and coffee will be served to keep energy flowing. We hope to attract an eclectic mix of work—everyone is encouraged to read. Prepare for a five-minute time slot and we will go from there.

Feel free to bring those pieces that cringe in the corner or beat on the door for release. Want to test your material before a live audience? Here we are! Tell your friends. All ages preferred; no categories. Work in Gaelic very welcome.

We look forward to hosting intriguing, controversial and just plain, comfortable writing here.

Admission is free to members and performers. £5 each for non-member audience.

Open Mic begins at 7:30 p.m. If you would like to join a few of us for dinner at the Edinbane Inn, make reservations for 6 p.m.  and we’ll see you there.

As usual, our bookshelf of Good-Reads will be available to browse and purchase for 50p each. The Reading Room Anthologies 1 and 2 may be purchased for £8.50 each. Ask us about our reasonable memberships.

For further information about events or the Reading Room, message us on Facebook at The Reading Room – Skye or email us at skyereadingroom@yahoo.co.uk.

Roger Hutchinson Reads From New Book (AGM follows)

Our guest reader for Tuesday, April 25, will be Roger Hutchinson, who will be giving us a glimpse into his new book, The Butcher, The Baker, The Candlestick Maker : The Story of Britain Through It’s Census Since 1801.

Brave Roger. To have taken on the quest to create a cohesive (and interesting) statement about Britain’s census with any number of pages suggests to me 700 milliliters of whisky at 43% and 100 grams of 84% chocolate. What was he smoking?

Thank goodness census records aren’t all numbers. Or at least the digits tell stories that we wouldn’t have without them. With the national census, people began to lose anonymity. We began to find out what the population was, who died and from what, and the numbers became the colour and texture of life–a self-portrait of the British Isles.

For example: Britain in 1801 still had its share of nomadic descendants and the enumerators had to follow them to their haunts: “The numbers living out of houses vary with the seasons; in winter they shrink into dwellings, and in summer they swarm again in the fields, which have irresistible charms for the vagabond race, as well as for their near relatives, the hop-pickers and haymakers. Mixed among them are found some of the victims as well as some of the outcasts of society.” *

In The Butcher, the Baker, the Candlestick Maker, Roger Hutchinson looks at every census taken at the beginning of each decade for 200 years. All human life is here, from prime ministers to peasants and paupers, from Irish rebels to English patriots, from the last native speakers of Cornish to the first professional footballers, from communities of prostitutes to individuals called ‘abecedarians’, who made a living from teaching the alphabet.

Hutchinson is adept at producing books that talk about the people. He has over twenty publications, many of which you will see in every shop that sells books in Scotland, including Calum’s Road; St. Kilda: A People’s History; The Toon; Silent Weaver; and A Waxing Moon: The Modern Gaelic Revival. Because he is a journalist with the West Highland Free Press and a Raasay resident, he is also a local favorite author.

Following Roger’s presentation, we will have refreshments and then have a short AGM meeting to report on 2016, tell you about our programme for 2017-2018 and find out how you’d like to see the Reading Room develop in the future.

The event will be held at Edinbane Community Hall, starting at 7:30 p.m. The lighter evenings should make parking easier, and rumour has it that Edinbane Inn is open Tuesday nights again, for anyone wanting to make an evening it.

Admission is free to members and £5 for non-members. Everyone is welcome. Our reasonable membership is available at every meeting. Reading Room anthologies, Island Life and A Stillness of Mind, are for sale at £8.50 each, and we have a Good Read selection of literary works at prices that will make them jump into your hands.

For further information about the Reading Room, please email us at skyereadingroom@yahoo.co.uk or message us on Facebook, at The Reading Room-Skye.

This event is sponsored in part by Scottish Book Trust.

* Great Britain Historical GIS Project 2004-17. The GBH GIS is a network of collaborating academic researchers. For details please contact Humphrey Southall (Humphrey.Southall@gbhgis.org).